Thursday, November 3, 2016

Review: Angles of Attack

Angles of Attack Angles of Attack by Marko Kloos
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Taking it up a notch

After the slightly disappointing book 2 of the Frontlines series, book 3 comes back with tight action and tense situations. The Lankies seem a little less unstoppable. Can't wait to read book 4.

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Saturday, October 29, 2016

Review: The Weapon Shops of Isher

The Weapon Shops of Isher The Weapon Shops of Isher by A.E. van Vogt
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Classic Science Fiction at its best. This sequel to The Weapon Makers was originally published in 1951 and may seem a little dated now, but in this continuation of the classic story of the battle between the immortal Hedrock and Empress Innelda over the Weapons Shops, A.E Van Vogt established his place among the great Science Fiction authors.

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Review: The Weapon Makers

The Weapon Makers The Weapon Makers by A.E. van Vogt
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Classic Science Fiction at its best. The Weapon Makers was originally published in 1946 and may seem a little dated now, but this is a classic story of the battle between the immortal Hedrock and Empress Innelda over the Weapons Shops and "The Right to Buy Weapons is the Right to Be Free."

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Sunday, December 22, 2013

Programming iOS 5 by Matt Neuburg

Get started programming for iOS on the iPhone and iPad! If you ever wanted to be able to write your own apps, then “Programming iOS 5” published by O’Reilly Media will show you how.

This book will introduce you to the in’s & out’s of the Xcode programming environment and the Objective-C language. Learn all about the basic objects such as scroll views, table views, and controls.

Chapters in Part I cover Objective-C objects, messages, classes, and instances. Part II shows you the anatomy of an Xcode project and how to use the built-in documentation. Part III covers the Cocoa classes. Part IV is all about Views, including layers and animation. Part V covers View Controllers. Part VI will introduce you to some of the available Frameworks.

Matt touches on all of the important things you will need to know before you start programming for iOS. I found this book to be very thorough and easy to follow. Any previous programming experience you can bring to the table will definitely help, but due to the unique style of Objective-C you may have to adjust how you think about achieving your programming goals.

You can write an iOS app today!


Click here to learn more about or to purchase this book.


Disclosure: I received a free copy of this ebook as part of the O’Reilly Reader Review Program.

Sunday, February 5, 2012

Getting Started with the Internet of Things by Cuno Pfister

This book’s subtitle says it all; ‟Connecting Sensors and Microcontrollers to the Cloud.” If you ever wanted to be able to remotely monitor or record sensor data via the internet, then “Getting Started with the Internet of Things” published by O’Reilly Media proves that the age of microcontrollers is upon us.

This book introduces us to the “Netduino Plus” microcontroller board, which is fully programmable using the .NET Framework. The information contained in this book is will be of great benefit to anyone getting started in the rapidly growing arena of embedded devices. 

Cuno keeps us on the right path with a generous amount of sample code and a walkthrough of the .NET development environment.  Separate chapters cover Writing to Actuators and Reading from Sensors. We then move on to how to connect the Netduino to the internet via HTTP. Pachube is introduced as an example of using one of the many available cloud services to store and share data in the “cloud.”

The final chapter covers where to go from here, offering suggestions and inspiration on the unlimited possibilities that the world of microcontrollers introduces. I would recommend this book to anyone who is interested in embedded devices and how to connect them to the internet.


Click here to learn more about or to purchase this book.


Disclosure: I received a free copy of this ebook as part of the O’Reilly Reader Review Program.

Saturday, May 28, 2011

Learning the iOS 4 SDK for JavaScript Programmers by Danny Goodman

The first book I ever read by Danny Goodman was “The Complete Hypercard Handbook” which was published in 1987 and was the best selling Macintosh book at that time. Fast forward to 2011 and “Learning the iOS 4 SDK for JavaScript Programmers” published by O’Reilly Media. See how far we have come.

This well-written book introduces newcomers to the world of iOS programming. While it is intended to be a guide for those currently familiar with JavaScript programming concepts, the book is general enough to benefit anyone hoping to learn how to use Apple’s Xcode application and the iOS 4 SDK.

Xcode comes with lots of reference documentation, but Danny keeps us on the right path with a generous amount of sample code and even includes the code for a test workbench that the reader can use to experiment with various code snippets. After examining the differences between an interpreted language like JavaScript and code compiled to run natively, he dives right into a quick tour of the Xcode environment and by the end of Chapter 2 will have you running your first app on the iPhone simulator. I would definitely recommend this book to anyone who is interested in iOS programming.


Click here to learn more about or to purchase this book.


Disclosure: I received a free copy of this ebook as part of the O’Reilly Reader Review Program.

Saturday, February 26, 2011

O'Reilly School of Technology

I have just signed up for the PHP/SQL programming certificate program at the O’Reilly School of Technology. The certificate will be issued by The University of Illinois, who have been offering online IT courses and certificates since 1998.


The four courses in the PHP/SQL programming certificate program are:


O’Reilly currently offers a total of 10 different certificate programs, and many more individual courses if you're not interested in a complete program.


Tuesday, January 11, 2011

The Future of Publishing

I am really excited about the plethora of eReaders and eBooks that are finally appearing. Having been a fan of eBooks since the days of the Rocket eBook, I can tell you that there have never been so many choices available on the market. It is also great to see some publishers going with the idea of DRM-free eBooks. O'Reilly Media being a prime example.

Which brings me to my favorite eBook format: ePUB

It is great to see that so many vendors are adopting the open ePUB standard defined by the International Digital Publishing Forum (IDPF).

This standard consists of three specifications:
  • Open Publishing Structure (OPS)
  • Open Packaging Format (OPF)
  • OEBPS Container Format (OCF)

Combined they form a single .epub file which internally uses XHTML files to build the structure of the eBook. The open format, flowable text, image support, CSS styles, and embedded font support combine to form a winning package.


Click here for more information on the ePUB standard.

Sunday, November 11, 2007

The Hermit

The Hermit After a long and busy lifetime, building, creating, loving, hating, fighting, compromising, failing, succeeding, the Fool feels a profound need to retreat. In a small, rustic home deep in the woods, he hides, reading, cleaning, organizing, resting or just thinking. But every night at dusk he heads out, traveling across the bare, autumnal landscape. He carries only a staff and a lantern.

It is during these restless walks from dusk till dawn, peering at and examining whatever takes his fancy, that he sees and realizes things he's missed, about himself and the world. It is as if the secret corners in his head were being slowly illuminated, corners he never knew existed. In a way, he has become the Fool again; as in the beginning, he goes wherever inspiration leads him.

But as the Fool, his staff rested on his shoulder, carrying unseen his pack. The Fool was like the pack, whatever it was he could be was wrapped up, unknown. The Hermit’s staff leans out before him, not behind. And it carries a lantern, not a pack. The Hermit is like the lantern, illuminated from within by all he is.

Click here to learn more about Tarot cards.

Tuesday, October 30, 2007

Welcome!

Is technology the greatest invention of mankind? Or is it actually a boondoggle that consumes more of our time and effort than it professes to save us? Has our technology brought us to new heights of understanding, or merely turned us into uncaring consumers who are continuously looking for the next “new” thing?